2013

January 20, 2013
PRRI January 2013 Survey

The January 2013 Survey focuses on two separate topics: rates of gun ownership and attitudes about gun control, and attitudes about sports and the Super Bowl. The survey includes questions that measure support for passing stricter gun control laws, for stricter enforcement of gun control laws, and for loosening current gun control laws. The survey looks at impressions of the National Rifle Association (NRA), self-identification as pro-life and pro-choice, and what method would be most effective in reducing mass shootings. Additionally, the survey delves into American views about sports, probing views about whether Americans are more likely to go to church or watch football on any given Sunday, whether they are a fan of a particular sports team, and the importance of sports fandom. The survey also explores attitudes about the role God plays in sports, including whether that God rewards athletes who have faith with good health and success and to what extent God plays a role in determining which team wins a sporting event.

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 1,033 (618 landline; 415 cellphone)

Data Collected: January 16-20, 2013

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2012

December 9, 2012
PRRI/RNS December 2012 Survey

The PRRI/RNS December 2012 Survey explores public attitudes about climate change, extreme weather, and the “end of the world.” The survey probes to what extent Americans believe there is solid evidence that earth’s average temperature is rising, and whether the U.S. government should do more to address the issue. The survey also examines views about environmental stewardship and dominionism, and examines whether Americans believe earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, and other natural disasters are signs from God, if God is in control of everything that happens in the world, and if God punishes entire nations. Additionally, the survey assesses whether Americans think the severity of recent natural disasters is evidence of biblical “end times,” and whether they think that the end of the world, as predicted by the Book of Revelations, will happen in their lifetimes.

 

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 1,018 (707 landline; 311 cellphone)

Data Collected: December 5-9, 2012

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November 11, 2012
PRRI 2012 Post-election American Values Survey

The PRRI 2012 Post-election American Values Survey looks at how Americans voted in the 2012 presidential election, their views of President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney and their attitudes about economic policy and the role of government. The survey probes the extent to which Americans’ vote preferences were influenced by debates, campaign commercials, or Facebook posts, and whether phrases like “honest and trustworthy” and “has strong religious beliefs” apply more to Obama or Romney. They survey also examines whether Americans believe that specific policies—such government regulation and corporations moving jobs overseas—are responsible for current economic problems, and whether Americans favor policies like cutting funding for the military and eliminating tax breaks for large corporations in order to reduce the budget deficit. Additional questions in the survey explore whether Americans agree that values like protecting the poor and promoting individual responsibility should guide the debate about the federal budget.

Sample: Participants from the PRRI 2012 American Values Survey

Total Respondents: 1,410

Data Collected: November 7-11, 2012

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September 30, 2012
PRRI 2012 American Values Survey

The PRRI 2012 American Values Survey, is PRRI’s third annual multi-issue survey on religion, values, and public policy. This year, the survey focuses heavily on religious change in America,  the 2012 presidential election, and views about the role of government and religion in society. Additional questions in the survey gauges public support for and moral judgments about marijuana legalization, abortion, same-sex marriage and the death penalty. The survey also documents attitudes about the importance of believing in God to be moral, whether moral decay is a major problem in society, and whether social problems would be alleviated if more people had a personal relationship with God.

 

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 3,003 (1,802 landline; 1,201 cellphone)

Data Collected: September 13-30, 2012

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September 10, 2012
PRRI/Georgetown 2012 Millennial Values & Voter Engagement Survey

The PRRI/Georgetown 2012 Millennial Values & Voter Engagement Survey is a follow-up to the 2012 Millennial Values & Voter Engagement Survey. The survey measures college-age millennials’ (age 18-25) attitudes about the 2012 presidential election, civic engagement, and the government. The survey includes questions that assess whether particular attributes such as “has strong religious beliefs,” “is honest and trustworthy,” and “understands the problems of poor Americans,” better describe President Barack Obama or Mitt Romney. The survey also examines millennials sense of political efficacy and engagement with government, asking whether they agree with statements like “voting gives people like me a say about how government runs things,” and includes an extensive battery exploring attitudes about affirmative action in college admissions.

 

Sample: Participants from the PRRI/Georgetown 2012 Millennial Values & Voter Engagement Survey (ages 18-25)

Total Respondents: 1,214 (Internet)

Data Collected: August 28-September 10, 2012

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August 15, 2012
PRRI/Brookings 2012 Race, Class and Culture Survey

The PRRI/Brookings 2012 Race, Class and Culture Survey, focuses on the economic concerns and experiences, and cultural attitudes among Americans. The survey examines public concerns about community problems, such as crime and racial tensions, and lack of funding for public schools, as well as the degree to which things like government regulation and corporations moving jobs overseas are responsible for the nation’s current economic problems. The survey also looks at personal experiences of economic hardship, such as receiving food stamps or unemployment benefits. Finally, the survey contains a series of cultural measures such as whether Americans know vegetarians and veterans, and if they prefer to shop at Wal-Mart or Target, and Dunkin Donuts or Starbucks.

 

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 2,501 (1,501 landline; 1,000 cellphone)

Data Collected: August 2-15, 2012

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August 12, 2012
PRRI/RNS August 2012 Survey

The PRRI/RNS August 2012 Survey looks at Americans’ attitudes about gun control.  The survey includes questions that measure support for passing stricter gun control laws, for stricter enforcement of existing gun control laws, and for loosening current gun control laws. Other questions in the survey examine whether Americans think that gun control laws should be decided at the state or national level, whether the constitutional right to own a gun is as important as other constitutional rights, and whether carrying a concealed gun should be allowed in various places, such as churches, government buildings, and college campuses.

 

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 1,006 (702 landline; 304 cellphone)

Data Collected: August 8-12, 2012

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July 29, 2012
PRRI July 2012 Survey

The PRRI July 2012 Survey focuses on social media and technology’s presence within religious institutions and how it may impact religious identity. The survey includes a battery of questions about whether Americans have ever performed a variety of activities, including following a religious leader on Twitter or Facebook, posting status updates on Facebook during worship services, joining a religious or spiritual group on Facebook, or downloading a podcast of a sermon.  The survey also includes an open-ended question that asks how Americans describe their religious beliefs on Facebook.

 

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 1,026 (714 landline; 312 cellphone)

Data Collected: July 25-29, 2012

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June 24, 2012
PRRI June 2012 Survey

The PRRI June 2012 Survey gauges American attitudes on health care reform, immigration, same-sex marriage, and federalism. The survey probes the extent to which Americans favor the Supreme Court ruling to overturn the recent health care law, as well as attitudes on the legality of same-sex marriage and if illegal immigrants brought to the U.S. as children should be granted legal status. The survey also explores knowledge of President Barack Obama’s position on same-sex marriage.  Finally, the survey includes questions that examine whether various policies, such as immigration, health care reform, and same-sex marriage, should be decided at the state or federal level.

 

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 1,022 (710 landline; 312 cellphone)

Data Collected: June 20-24, 2012

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June 23, 2012
PRRI 2012 African American & Hispanic Reproductive Issues Survey

This survey, which includes independent national samples of African Americans and Hispanic Americans, explores attitudes among both groups on reproductive health issues and abortion. The survey includes questions about whether abortion clinics are safe, whether at least some health care providers in respondents’ communities should provide legal abortions, and whether it should be possible for a woman to obtain a legal abortion in various circumstances. The survey also explores a broad range of reproductive health issues beyond abortion, including whether public schools should provide comprehensive sex education, whether testing for HIV should be made more available, and whether different types of employers, such as churches and publically-held corporations, should be required to provide health insurance plans that cover birth control.

 

Sample: Nationally representative, independent samples of African American and Hispanic adult (18+) living in the United States.

Total Respondents: Black Americans = 810 (Internet); Hispanic Americans = 813 (Internet)

Data Collected: June 14-23, 2012

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About the Data Vault
After an embargo period of one year, most PRRI surveys are made available to the public for secondary analysis.