2013

April 14, 2013
PRRI/Brookings April 2013 Survey

This report is based on the PRRI/Brookings April 2013 Survey, which gauges Americans’ attitudes on a path to citizenship and immigrants. Questions include a survey experiment that measures Americans’ support for a path to citizenship for immigrants living in the U.S. illegally. The experiment poses the question three different ways: without mentioning any requirements for immigrants; specifying that immigrants must meet “certain requirements”; and listing specific “requirements like paying back taxes, learning English and passing a background check” for illegal immigrants to be eligible to become U.S. citizens.

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 2,018 (1,234 landline; 784 cellphone)

Data Collected: April 5-14, 2013

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March 10, 2013
PRRI March 2013 Survey

The PRRI March 2013 Survey focuses on American attitudes about federal recognition of same-sex marriage and changing views on same-sex marriage in general. In addition to measuring support for same-sex marriage and adoption rights for gay and lesbian couples, the survey looks at whether the federal government should be required to recognize gay and lesbian marriages performed in states where they are legal, whether the issue should be decided at the state or federal level, and if Americans’ views on same-sex marriage have changed in the last five years. They survey also examines to how certain Americans are that their position on the issue is the right one. Finally, the survey includes questions about the sinfulness of sex between two adults of the same gender, whether sexual orientation can be changed, and support for ordaining women, and gay and lesbian people.

 

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 1,028 (613 landline; 415 cellphone)

Data Collected: March 6-10, 2013

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February 24, 2013
PRRI/Brookings 2013 Religion, Values & Immigration Reform Survey

The PRRI/Brookings 2013 Religion, Values & Immigration Survey looks at attitudes about immigrants, the current immigration system, and specific immigration reform policies. The survey looks at several dimensions in perceptions of immigrants, including their economic impact and cultural influence, as well as the extent to which they are changing local communities and the country. The survey examines the extent to which the public believes different types of immigrants—such as those who can speak English fluently or who have a spouse currently living in the U.S. legally—should be given preference in the immigration process. The survey also gauges perceptions of the flow of illegal immigration, which political party is viewed as better equipped to handle the issue of immigration, and whether the Republican Party’s position has helped or hurt it in recent elections.

 

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 4,465 (2,691 landline; 1,774 cellphone)

Data Collected: January 28 – February 24, 2013

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February 10, 2013
PRRI/RNS February 2013 Survey

The PRRI/RNS February 2013 Survey gauges whether or not Americans plan on celebrating Valentine’s Day and what activities are most common for those celebrating the holiday, including going out to dinner, having sex, and going to bed early. The survey also examines the amount of money Americans estimate they will spend on the holiday and the extent to which different religious beliefs, different political beliefs, and an unsatisfying sex life are problems for those in a relationship.

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 1,021 (610 landline; 411 cellphone)

Data Collected: February 6-10, 2013

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January 20, 2013
PRRI January 2013 Survey

The January 2013 Survey focuses on two separate topics: rates of gun ownership and attitudes about gun control, and attitudes about sports and the Super Bowl. The survey includes questions that measure support for passing stricter gun control laws, for stricter enforcement of gun control laws, and for loosening current gun control laws. The survey looks at impressions of the National Rifle Association (NRA), self-identification as pro-life and pro-choice, and what method would be most effective in reducing mass shootings. Additionally, the survey delves into American views about sports, probing views about whether Americans are more likely to go to church or watch football on any given Sunday, whether they are a fan of a particular sports team, and the importance of sports fandom. The survey also explores attitudes about the role God plays in sports, including whether that God rewards athletes who have faith with good health and success and to what extent God plays a role in determining which team wins a sporting event.

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 1,033 (618 landline; 415 cellphone)

Data Collected: January 16-20, 2013

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2012

December 9, 2012
PRRI/RNS December 2012 Survey

The PRRI/RNS December 2012 Survey explores public attitudes about climate change, extreme weather, and the “end of the world.” The survey probes to what extent Americans believe there is solid evidence that earth’s average temperature is rising, and whether the U.S. government should do more to address the issue. The survey also examines views about environmental stewardship and dominionism, and examines whether Americans believe earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, and other natural disasters are signs from God, if God is in control of everything that happens in the world, and if God punishes entire nations. Additionally, the survey assesses whether Americans think the severity of recent natural disasters is evidence of biblical “end times,” and whether they think that the end of the world, as predicted by the Book of Revelations, will happen in their lifetimes.

 

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 1,018 (707 landline; 311 cellphone)

Data Collected: December 5-9, 2012

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November 11, 2012
PRRI 2012 Post-election American Values Survey

The PRRI 2012 Post-election American Values Survey looks at how Americans voted in the 2012 presidential election, their views of President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney and their attitudes about economic policy and the role of government. The survey probes the extent to which Americans’ vote preferences were influenced by debates, campaign commercials, or Facebook posts, and whether phrases like “honest and trustworthy” and “has strong religious beliefs” apply more to Obama or Romney. They survey also examines whether Americans believe that specific policies—such government regulation and corporations moving jobs overseas—are responsible for current economic problems, and whether Americans favor policies like cutting funding for the military and eliminating tax breaks for large corporations in order to reduce the budget deficit. Additional questions in the survey explore whether Americans agree that values like protecting the poor and promoting individual responsibility should guide the debate about the federal budget.

Sample: Participants from the PRRI 2012 American Values Survey

Total Respondents: 1,410

Data Collected: November 7-11, 2012

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September 30, 2012
PRRI 2012 American Values Survey

The PRRI 2012 American Values Survey, is PRRI’s third annual multi-issue survey on religion, values, and public policy. This year, the survey focuses heavily on religious change in America,  the 2012 presidential election, and views about the role of government and religion in society. Additional questions in the survey gauges public support for and moral judgments about marijuana legalization, abortion, same-sex marriage and the death penalty. The survey also documents attitudes about the importance of believing in God to be moral, whether moral decay is a major problem in society, and whether social problems would be alleviated if more people had a personal relationship with God.

 

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 3,003 (1,802 landline; 1,201 cellphone)

Data Collected: September 13-30, 2012

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September 10, 2012
PRRI/Georgetown 2012 Millennial Values & Voter Engagement Survey

The PRRI/Georgetown 2012 Millennial Values & Voter Engagement Survey is a follow-up to the 2012 Millennial Values & Voter Engagement Survey. The survey measures college-age millennials’ (age 18-25) attitudes about the 2012 presidential election, civic engagement, and the government. The survey includes questions that assess whether particular attributes such as “has strong religious beliefs,” “is honest and trustworthy,” and “understands the problems of poor Americans,” better describe President Barack Obama or Mitt Romney. The survey also examines millennials sense of political efficacy and engagement with government, asking whether they agree with statements like “voting gives people like me a say about how government runs things,” and includes an extensive battery exploring attitudes about affirmative action in college admissions.

 

Sample: Participants from the PRRI/Georgetown 2012 Millennial Values & Voter Engagement Survey (ages 18-25)

Total Respondents: 1,214 (Internet)

Data Collected: August 28-September 10, 2012

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August 15, 2012
PRRI/Brookings 2012 Race, Class and Culture Survey

The PRRI/Brookings 2012 Race, Class and Culture Survey, focuses on the economic concerns and experiences, and cultural attitudes among Americans. The survey examines public concerns about community problems, such as crime and racial tensions, and lack of funding for public schools, as well as the degree to which things like government regulation and corporations moving jobs overseas are responsible for the nation’s current economic problems. The survey also looks at personal experiences of economic hardship, such as receiving food stamps or unemployment benefits. Finally, the survey contains a series of cultural measures such as whether Americans know vegetarians and veterans, and if they prefer to shop at Wal-Mart or Target, and Dunkin Donuts or Starbucks.

 

Sample: Nationally representative adult (18+) living in the United States

Total Respondents: 2,501 (1,501 landline; 1,000 cellphone)

Data Collected: August 2-15, 2012

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About the Data Vault
After an embargo period of one year, most PRRI surveys are made available to the public for secondary analysis.