2020

June 23, 2020
America’s Growing Support for Transgender Rights
Read the
Report
Download
Topline
Download Data Set
American Democracy in Crisis: The Fate of Pluralism in a Divided Nation
Read the
Report
Download
Topline
Download Data Set

2019

November 18, 2019
2019 AAPI Survey

Survey Methodology

The AAPI California Workers Survey was jointly designed by PRRI and AAPI Data and was made possible by a generous grant from the James Irvine Foundation. Results of the survey are based on interviews conducted by telephone and online from July 6 to September 6, 2019. Results are presented for 2,684 Asian American or Pacific Islander adults surveyed, producing an overall margin of sampling error of +/- 3.1% (including the design effect). Sampling was targeted towards the eight largest Asian national origin groups and Pacific Islanders that together account for 84% of the AAPI adult resident population (and 83% of the AAPI adult citizen population).

Telephone interviews were conducted in 7 languages (English, Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean, Vietnamese, Hmong, Cambodian) – chosen according to the interviewee’s preference. The survey included Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders and 8 Asian national origin groups (Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, Hmong, and Cambodian). Forty-seven percent of the adult citizen surveys were conducted by telephone, and of these, 53% of interviews were conducted in an Asian language; the online surveys were conducted entirely in English.

The primary sampling strategy for 2,509 of the interviews was to interview individuals drawn from a random selection of respondents in a listed sample stratified by national origin. Samples included registered voter and commercial vendor lists classified by ethnic name (first, middle, and/or last) and tract-level ethnic concentration. Interviews were conducted by ISA (Interviewing Services of America), located in Van Nuys, CA. In addition, ISA partnered with various online sample vendors that have reliable panels of Asian American and Pacific Islander populations who are able to take responses in English. Younger Asian Americans and native-born Asian Americans are more likely to be part of the online sample and help correct the biases of telephone-only interviews that skew older and more foreign-born.

The additional 175 interviews were conducted among Californians who identify as AAPI in Ipsos’s Knowledge Panel. Respondents are recruited to the KnowledgePanel using an addressed-based sampling methodology from the Delivery Sequence File of the USPS – a database with full coverage of all delivery addresses in the U.S. As such, it covers all households regardless of their phone status, providing a representative online sample. Unlike opt-in panels, households are not permitted to “self-select” into the panel; and are generally limited to how many surveys they can take within a given time period. The survey invitation was sent to all AAPI Californians in the sample.

The data are weighted to Census parameters to statistically account for any demographic differences of interest between the sample and population parameters for analyses of the AAPI population, as well as for subgroups of the population, on the following dimensions: size of group within a region, educational attainment, gender, age, and nativity. Defined regions include: Bay Area, Central Valley, Inland Empire, Los Angeles County, Orange County, San Diego, and other parts of California.

The sample sizes by ethnicity are as follows, along with an estimation of the margin of error associated with each sample size (in parentheses):

Asian Indian: 317 (+/- 6%)

Cambodian: 250 (+/-7%)

Chinese: 413 (+/- 5%)

Filipino: 344 (+/- 5.5%)

Japanese: 327 (+/- 6%)

Korean: 312 (+/- 6%)

Vietnamese: 313 (+/- 6%)

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 158 (+/- 8%)

Sampling error from the size of the sample is only one type of error possible in surveys. Findings may also be subject to variation from question wording, question order, and the time and date when the survey was conducted.


Read the
Report
Download
Topline
Download Data Set
November 12, 2019
2019 Nebraska Survey

Survey Methodology

The survey was designed by PRRI and conducted among a random sample of adults (age 18 and over) living in Nebraska. The survey included 1,321 total Nebraskans, including 203 who are part of Ipsos’s KnowledgePanel and 1,118 who were recruited by Ipsos using opt-in survey panels. As many cases as possible came from Ipsos’s probability-based KnowledgePanel, which were then weighted and used as the benchmark for the opt-in, nonprobability portion of the survey. Interviews were conducted online in both English and Spanish between August 23 and October 7, 2019. The survey was made possible by a generous grant from the Sherwood Foundation.

Respondents are recruited to the KnowledgePanel using an addressed-based sampling methodology from the Delivery Sequence File of the USPS – a database with full coverage of all delivery addresses in the U.S. As such, it covers all households regardless of their phone status, providing a representative online sample. Unlike opt-in panels, households are not permitted to “self-select” into the panel; and are generally limited to how many surveys they can take within a given time period.

The initial sample drawn from the KnowledgePanel was adjusted using pre-stratification weights so that it approximates the adult U.S. population defined by the latest March supplement of the Current Population Survey.  Next, a probability proportional to size (PPS) sampling scheme was used to select a representative sample.

To reduce the effects of any non-response bias, a post-stratification adjustment was applied based on demographic distributions from the most recent American Community Survey (ACS). The post-stratification weight rebalanced the sample based on the following benchmarks: age, race and ethnicity, gender, Census division, metro area, education, and income. The sample weighting was accomplished using an iterative proportional fitting (IFP) process that simultaneously balances the distributions of all variables. Weights were trimmed to prevent individual interviews from having too much influence on the final results. In addition to an overall national weight, separate weights were computed for each state to ensure that the demographic characteristics of the sample closely approximate the demographic characteristics of the target populations. The state-level post-stratification weights rebalanced the sample based on the following benchmarks: age, race and ethnicity, gender, education, and income.

These weights from the KnowledgePanel cases were then used as the benchmarks for the opt-in sample in a process called “calibration.” This calibration process is used to correct for inherent biases associated with nonprobability opt-in panels. The calibration methodology aims to realign respondents from nonprobability samples with respect to a multidimensional set of measures to improve their representation. As compared to surveys that exclusively rely on non-probability samples without any calibration, these calibrated weights enable the resulting blended samples to represent the target population more effectively and offer more robust inferential possibilities. This improved representation is not only with respect to geodemographic distributions, but also with respect to an important set of attitudinal and behavioral measures.

Margins of error cannot be precisely calculated for this type of study, since only part of the sample was collected using probability methods. However, a margin of error can be reported to approximate the error associated with the sample size of the survey. The estimated margin of error for the Nebraska survey is +/- 3.9 percentage points at the 95% level of confidence, which includes a design effect of 2.1. Table 1 reports unweighted sample sizes for demographic subgroups. In addition to sampling error, surveys may also be subject to error or bias due to question wording, context, and order effects.

Read the
Report
Download
Topline
Download Data Set
October 20, 2019
2019 American Values Survey: Supplement

Methodology

The survey was designed and conducted by PRRI. The survey was made possible by generous grants from The Carnegie Corporation of New York, Unitarian Universalist Veatch Program at Shelter Rock, and The New World Foundation. Interviews were conducted among a random sample of 2,527 adults (age 18 and up) living in the United States including all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Interviews were conducted both online using a self-administered design and by telephone using live interviewers. All interviews were conducted among participants in AmeriSpeak, a probability-based panel designed to be representative of the national U.S. adult population run by NORC at the University of Chicago. Panel participants without Internet access, which included 213 respondents, were interviewed via telephone by professional interviewers under the direction of NORC. Interviewing was conducted in both Spanish and English between August 22 and September 15, 2019.

NORC’s AmeriSpeak Panel provides a representative panel of civilian, non-institutional adults (age 18 and over) living in the United States. The sample frame was developed using a two-stage probability sample design to create a representative sample of households in the United States. The first stage uses National Frame Areas (NFAs), geographic areas that have a population of at least 10,000 people. The National Sample Frame contains almost 3 million households and includes 80,000 rural households. Additionally, NORC oversampled housing units in segments (Census tracts or block groups) that include hard-to-reach populations, including young adults, Hispanics and African Americans. Panel recruitment proceeded in two stages. First, a mail solicitation is sent to a randomly selected household along with follow-up telephone calls and email solicitations if necessary. In the second stage, households that have not responded to the initial inquiry or follow-ups receive an enhanced incentive offer and a personal visit from NORC field interviewers. Members typically participate in panel surveys two or three times a month. For more information about AmeriSpeak, please visit: http://amerispeak.norc.org

The weighting is accomplished in two separate stages. First, panel base weights are calculated for every household based on the probability of selection from the NORC National Frame, the sampling frame that is used to sample housing units for AmeriSpeak. Household level weights are then assigned to each eligible adult in every recruited household. In the second stage, sample demographics are balanced to match target population parameters for gender, age, education, race and Hispanic ethnicity, and division (U.S. Census definitions), housing type, and telephone usage. The telephone usage parameter came from an analysis of the National Health Interview Survey. All other weighting parameters are derived from an analysis of the U.S. Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey.

The sample weighting is accomplished using an iterative proportional fitting (IFP) process that simultaneously balances the distributions of all variables. Weights were trimmed to prevent individual interviews from having too much influence on the final results. The use of these weights in statistical analysis ensures that the demographic characteristics of the sample closely approximate the demographic characteristics of the target populations.

The margin of error for the survey is +/- 2.8 percentage points at the 95% level of confidence. The design effect for the survey is 1.83. In addition to sampling error, surveys may also be subject to error or bias due to question-wording, context, and order effects.

Read the
Report
Download
Topline
Download Data Set

2018

October 29, 2018
PRRI 2018 American Values Survey: Supplement

Sample: Nationally representative adults (18+) living in the United States.

Total Respondents: 2,509 (2,400 online, 109 telephone), Supplement 1,003 (401 landline, 602 cell phone)

Collected: September 17 – October 1, 2018, Supplement October 16-21, 2018

The PRRI 2018 American Values Survey investigated Americans’ views going into the 2018 midterm elections, including if and how they planned to vote, issues prioritized, and whether the election would be a referendum on President Donald Trump. The survey also probed opinions regarding the then-ongoing investigations of Trump and associations with Russia, sexual assault and the #MeToo movement, immigration and cultural change, and race relations in the U.S. The supplement re-asked a few questions about the election and ascertained how Americans felt about the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

Read the
Report
Download
Topline
Download Data Set
PRRI 2018 American Values Survey

Sample: Nationally representative adults (18+) living in the United States.

Total Respondents: 2,509 (2,400 online, 109 telephone), Supplement 1,003 (401 landline, 602 cell phone)

Collected: September 17 – October 1, 2018, Supplement October 16-21, 2018

The PRRI 2018 American Values Survey investigated Americans’ views going into the 2018 midterm elections, including if and how they planned to vote, issues prioritized, and whether the election would be a referendum on President Donald Trump. The survey also probed opinions regarding the then-ongoing investigations of Trump and associations with Russia, sexual assault and the #MeToo movement, immigration and cultural change, and race relations in the U.S. The supplement re-asked a few questions about the election and ascertained how Americans felt about the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

Read the
Report
Download
Topline
Download Data Set
October 11, 2018
PRRI/The Atlantic September 2018 Voter Engagement Survey

Sample: Nationally representative adults (18+) living in the United States, with oversamples of respondents ages 18-29, and respondents living in Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota.

Total Respondents: 1,811 (online probability panel)

Collected: August 24–September 13, 2018

Conducted by PRRI in partnership with The Atlantic Magazine, the September 2018 Voter Engagement survey asks Americans about their attitudes toward the 2018 midterm elections, differing levels of civic and political engagement, and whether different groups represent their values or interests. The survey also includes an in-depth analysis on states in the Great Lakes regions and where they share common views or diverge with the rest of the country.

Read the
Report
Download
Topline
Download Data Set
October 3, 2018
PRRI Reproductive Health and 2018 Midterms

Sample: Nationally representative adults (18+) living in the United States.

Total Respondents: 1,856 (732 landline, 1,124 cell phone)

Collected: August 22–September 2, 2018

The PRRI Reproductive Health and 2018 Midterms Survey includes a number of abortion and healthcare-related questions about respondents’ views on abortion as a critical issue, the legality of abortion, access to contraception, and personal experience with abortion. The survey also queries respondents about the rising cost of health care, the protection of health care coverage for pre-existing conditions, whether employers should be able to opt-out of birth control coverage based on religion, and whether contraception should be provided to low-income women through programs like Medicaid. In addition, the survey asks respondents’ views about child sexual abuse by clergy in churches, the pay gap between men and women, sexual harassment in the workplace, the role of women in politics, as well as LBGT rights, and LGBT-related issues and their stances on non-discrimination laws and religiously based service refusals. Finally, the survey asks about the likelihood of respondents to vote in the 2018 congressional election and their voting preferences as well as their views about Donald Trump and the level of importance they place on abortion as a political issue.

Read the
Report
Download
Topline
Download Data Set
About the Data Vault
After an embargo period of one year, most PRRI surveys are made available to the public for secondary analysis.